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Government making U of M less competitive

Why attend the University of Manitoba? It’s a question that can be asked in two contexts: why does the U of M seemingly feel weighed down by political decisions of the provincial government? And why should a student come to the U of M despite these struggles?

Fishers are not the cause of Lake Winnipeg’s condition

Historically, Manitoba has treated Lake Winnipeg as a sink for resources, citing the lake’s economic value as motivation to maintain its ecological integrity. But this approach means sustaining the bare minimum of environmental standards to ensure its supposed value does not diminish. The result of this approach is a policy of perpetual catch-up — pollute as you go and fix the problem later. That is exactly what the PCs are doing when they blame the sustainability practices of fishers for the lake’s pollution and utter humble praises for Manitoba Hydro in the same speech.

More questions than answers in speech from the throne

The Liberal Party of Canada pitched itself as the progressive option on the campaign trail, but the speech from the throne on Nov. 23 lacked bold new ideas. Instead of emphasizing challenges of Canadians — such as the absence of universal pharmacare or ending fossil fuel subsidies — the new Liberal government presented a plan that lacks vision and heavily relies on past promises that have yet to be fulfilled.

Canada must demilitarize to achieve climate neutrality

By using the military for Canada’s climate crises, Trudeau is implying Canadians are on their own until after the damage is done. The prime minister clearly prefers to adapt to global warming rather than mitigate it. The military is part of the problem, not the solution.

Canadian electric vehicle manufacturing on a tightrope

The North American Leaders’ Summit, held after a five-year hiatus, showcased trilateral dialogues between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico about building a united front to counter the various challenges the continent faces. A Canadian delegation led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau emphasized issues like climate change, pandemic recovery and the supply chain, but the elephant in the room was U.S. President Joe Biden’s protectionist policies which may have great impacts on the Canadian auto-manufacturing industry. Such aspects of Biden’s Build Back Better Framework are putting the historic friendship fostered by each leader in doubt.

Remembering Betty Osborne, Manitoba forgot action

Violence against Indigenous women does not stop with the crime — violence also materializes in the investigation. By refusing to properly look into these crimes, white, male-dominated police forces send a clear message to Indigenous communities: that police serve to protect some people and to cause irreparable damage to others.

Pallister’s legacy living on in Stefanson’s administration

Heather Stefanson, the first female premier, is no stranger to provincial politics. Stefanson served in various roles in Brian Pallister’s administration, including deputy premier. On the campaign trail, Stefanson promised to lead the Progressive Conservative party (PC) in a different direction, attempting to distance herself from Pallister’s contentious political legacy, but her inaction so far has left Manitobans wondering if the party’s insider candidate was the right choice.

Gender parity is not enough in new cabinet

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently unveiled his new cabinet that will head back to Ottawa, Ont. to work on challenges like housing, mental health, climate change, reconciliation and Canada’s pandemic recovery, to mention a few. The 38-member executive body maintained gender parity by naming women to major departments such as finance, defence and foreign affairs. But Trudeau’s selections have been met with scrutiny due to the lack of ethnic representation of racialized groups, especially women of colour.

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