food security



Urban beekeeping: legal at last

Local food production in the form of urban agriculture is one of those things that is very hard to formulate a coherent argument against. Producing your own food benefits you in money saved and costs avoided, and benefits the city as a whole in energy saved on transportation costs and increased local food security. It’s also just plain healthier, for the body and the soul, to grow what you consume.

Beekeeping is actually even more beneficial than plain old food production. Not only does it provide honey for the people keeping the bees (and usually enough extra for them to share or sell), but the bees provide an important ecological service – the pollination of flowers – for the entire neighbourhood. The entire city is made a little bit more robust and sustainable as a living system, at no cost whatsoever to anyone other than the beekeepers.


The poor will be the first to bear the brunt of climate change

Climate change is this generation’s most pressing social concern that will, at some point or another, affect everyone if we continue down our current path. Although climate change does not discriminate its victims, it is the most impoverished individuals of society that will be the first to suffer the consequences and bear the brunt of the effects of climate change.

According to a recent report by the World Bank, the effects of climate change will force 100 million people into extreme poverty by the year 2030.