Graphic credit to Bram Keast

Questioning corporatized campuses

Corporate influences on higher education, research

The corporatization of higher education and the corporate prioritization of research questions are serious concerns challenging the intellectual integrity of the academy and public research institutions. Since the 1980s, the corporatization of universities has become an increasingly significant concept with the wider, deeper impacts of privatization on both local and global scales. Cambridge Dictionaries Online […]

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Graphic by Bram Keast

True North deserves a shout out, but not during the anthem

Disruption of the anthem symbolizes disrespect for Canada

Canada’s national anthem can be heard at every game the Winnipeg Jets play. At home, and sometimes away, crowds full of enthusiastic fans shout “True North” much louder than they sing the rest of the words. This is followed by cheering. The “Shout out” is intended to acknowledge the contribution of True North Sports and […]

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graphic provided by Justin Ladia

Playing the name game

Analyzing racist sports logos, and the impact of change

Debate has raged on in recent months over the Washington NFL football team’s name, the Redskins. The team moved to the nation’s capital in 1937. Numerous parties, including the National Congress of American Indians, have made their voices heard over the controversial team name since that time. Despite increased demand to change the name, Redskins […]

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The Deciding Vote. Graphic by Evan Tremblay

Removing barriers to fair elections in Winnipeg

A chance to change how we do politics

What sets municipal elections apart from those at other levels of government is that candidates are less constrained to toeing the party line. Municipal elections give an opportunity to bring forth creative ideas in a way that other levels of government don’t. While the party structure’s influence on the provincial and federal levels of Canadian […]

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PTSD night terrors. Graphic by Bram Keast.

You’re sad? Go for a walk.

Mental health misconceptions hamper access to treatment

You’re depressed? Go for a walk. That’s the common response to individuals with a mental illness seeking help. A recent op-ed published in CBC Manitoba by David Grebstad demonstrates a prevailing attitude about the diagnostic process and access to treatment for individuals with mental illnesses: that these individuals aren’t really sick, are taking a toll […]

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Clarifying the ‘trope of objectivity’

Last month, I was lucky enough to conduct one of my favourite interviews ever, following one of the best public lectures I have ever seen. John Greyson, a Canadian filmmaker who spent almost two months locked up in Tora Prison in Egypt, was in Winnipeg to deliver the keynote speech for Israeli Apartheid Week. Greyson […]

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Graphic by Bradly Wohlgemuth

Politicked off? Don’t vote

There is nothing to gain from supporting a broken system

“Everything that can be said about the suffrage may be summed up in a sentence.    To vote is to give up your own power.”   -Élisée Reclus   It seems that many Canadians have their knickers in a twist over the proposed Fair Elections Act, the new federal bill which would overhaul the Elections […]

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Photo by: Katy MacKinnon

The price of convenience

Smartphones and technological complacency

Seemingly everyone has a smartphone these days. According to surveys from 2013, almost half of all Canadians and more than half of all Americans use the high-powered mobile devices. Until recently, I was one of those last few holdouts, sitting hunched over my slide-out Nokia Surge typing impeccably spelled text messages on its full QWERTY […]

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