Comment

The declining value of our degrees

The reputation of the University of Manitoba has been damaged by recent news stories about the rise in academic dishonesty and admission changes in the…


People are a product of their physical environment

Winnipeg is a city. This truth is self-evident, but was apparently not on our mayor’s mind when he declared “I have no interest in offering a platform for the types of violent and harmful views” held by members of a misogynistic group that was planning a meetup this past Saturday. Bowman was joined by the mayors of Toronto, Calgary, and Vancouver in denouncing the group – fans of the anti-feminist blog Return of Kings – and declaring them unwelcome in their respective cities.



Negative stereotypes still shroud “feminism”

In January, Manitoba celebrated the 100-year anniversary of becoming the first province to extend the franchise to women. In light of such a milestone in Manitoban history, it is worthwhile to reflect on how far women have come in terms of equality.

There are arguments to be made on both sides of the debate. On one hand, it has been shown time and time again that there is a gender wage gap. According to a UN report, women employed in the same profession, and with the same experience, make 24 per cent less than what men make.


The poor will be the first to bear the brunt of climate change

Climate change is this generation’s most pressing social concern that will, at some point or another, affect everyone if we continue down our current path. Although climate change does not discriminate its victims, it is the most impoverished individuals of society that will be the first to suffer the consequences and bear the brunt of the effects of climate change.

According to a recent report by the World Bank, the effects of climate change will force 100 million people into extreme poverty by the year 2030.


LettersToTheEditor

RE: Strengthening student media

Kudos to Craig Adolphe for so frankly and compellingly making the case for the value of a sustainable and independent student media outlet (Strengthening student…


‘One man’s vulgarity is another man’s lyric’

If I told you there was a Twitter feud in November 2012, I doubt you would be surprised; Twitter has enough feuds to go around. However, the one I’m going to tell you about resulted in something unusual. This feud did not simply end with frustration, angry words, or hashtags. It ended in a courtroom.

The Twitter exchange between Toronto artist Gregory Alan Elliott and a group of feminist activists led by Stephanie Guthrie resulted in the arrest and charge of Elliott on two counts of criminal harassment. It wasn’t until three years later on Jan. 22, 2016 that a Toronto judge found Elliott not guilty. The judge’s decision is a resounding defense of freedom of speech.




Systemic racism, dispossession still with us

In a recent CBC interview, Howard Sapers, the Correctional Investigator of Canada, outlined some of the most recent statistics on prison populations and incarceration rates in Canada. They show dramatic increases in the number of Aboriginal people incarcerated in Canada, which can only be described as proof of the systemic racism inherent in our country’s judicial system.

25 per cent of the incarcerated population in federal correctional facilities are of Aboriginal ancestry. In the Prairie provinces, this rises to 48 per cent. When looking at Aboriginal women independently, over 36 per cent of women in Canadian prisons are of Aboriginal ancestry.

These numbers are staggering, but even more so when compared to the statistics from previous years. To put this into perspective, Aboriginal people made up 4.3 per cent of Canada’s population in 2011 (the year of the last census).