Graphic by Kelly Campbell

Urban beekeeping: legal at last

Local food production in the form of urban agriculture is one of those things that is very hard to formulate a coherent argument against. Producing your own food benefits you in money saved and costs avoided, and benefits the city as a whole in energy saved on transportation costs and increased local food security. It’s also just plain healthier, for the body and the soul, to grow what you consume.

Beekeeping is actually even more beneficial than plain old food production. Not only does it provide honey for the people keeping the bees (and usually enough extra for them to share or sell), but the bees provide an important ecological service – the pollination of flowers – for the entire neighbourhood. The entire city is made a little bit more robust and sustainable as a living system, at no cost whatsoever to anyone other than the beekeepers.

Graphic by Jondell Coombs

Aboriginal History Month: essential, unknown

February is Black History Month. During February we reflect on the historical treatment of black people, who were taken from their homeland and carted across the Atlantic and, for those who survived the voyage, sold into slavery. That was just the beginning of the ill treatment of black people in North America, which continued well past the abolition of slavery and is still very much present today.

During Black History Month, we are encouraged to read books and watch movies that teach about the struggles that black people faced, and to reflect on and celebrate the accomplishments they have fought hard to achieve, such as the right to vote, access to education, and the desegregation of public spaces

Photo by Chantal Zdan

An open letter to prospective deans

As the three short-listed candidates, all from outside Manitoba, I would like to first welcome you to our province. I hope that you enjoy your visit.

Students do not have much meaningful input into your appointment (a process that is opaque at best) but I hope that you will hear me out nonetheless.

It is clear, so far, that the issue of a tuition increase is not on your radar. I don’t blame you. The faculty may have forgotten to mention it. In case you are interested, here is my perspective.

Graphic by Kelly Campbell

The declining value of our degrees

The reputation of the University of Manitoba has been damaged by recent news stories about the rise in academic dishonesty and admission changes in the…

Graphic by Jondell Coombs

People are a product of their physical environment

Winnipeg is a city. This truth is self-evident, but was apparently not on our mayor’s mind when he declared “I have no interest in offering a platform for the types of violent and harmful views” held by members of a misogynistic group that was planning a meetup this past Saturday. Bowman was joined by the mayors of Toronto, Calgary, and Vancouver in denouncing the group – fans of the anti-feminist blog Return of Kings – and declaring them unwelcome in their respective cities.

Graphic by Bram Keast

Negative stereotypes still shroud “feminism”

In January, Manitoba celebrated the 100-year anniversary of becoming the first province to extend the franchise to women. In light of such a milestone in Manitoban history, it is worthwhile to reflect on how far women have come in terms of equality.

There are arguments to be made on both sides of the debate. On one hand, it has been shown time and time again that there is a gender wage gap. According to a UN report, women employed in the same profession, and with the same experience, make 24 per cent less than what men make.

Graphic by Jondell Coombs

The poor will be the first to bear the brunt of climate change

Climate change is this generation’s most pressing social concern that will, at some point or another, affect everyone if we continue down our current path. Although climate change does not discriminate its victims, it is the most impoverished individuals of society that will be the first to suffer the consequences and bear the brunt of the effects of climate change.

According to a recent report by the World Bank, the effects of climate change will force 100 million people into extreme poverty by the year 2030.


RE: Strengthening student media

Kudos to Craig Adolphe for so frankly and compellingly making the case for the value of a sustainable and independent student media outlet (Strengthening student…

Graphic by Jondell Coombs

‘One man’s vulgarity is another man’s lyric’

If I told you there was a Twitter feud in November 2012, I doubt you would be surprised; Twitter has enough feuds to go around. However, the one I’m going to tell you about resulted in something unusual. This feud did not simply end with frustration, angry words, or hashtags. It ended in a courtroom.

The Twitter exchange between Toronto artist Gregory Alan Elliott and a group of feminist activists led by Stephanie Guthrie resulted in the arrest and charge of Elliott on two counts of criminal harassment. It wasn’t until three years later on Jan. 22, 2016 that a Toronto judge found Elliott not guilty. The judge’s decision is a resounding defense of freedom of speech.