Solidarity in Sisterhood

The Women's March on Washington (Winnipeg) in Photos

 

Local activists and advocates, such as Uzoma Chioma, founder of QPOC Winnipeg (above), spoke to thousands of passionate attendees, who packed the lobby as well as the second and third storey balconies of Portage Place before taking to the streets. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Indigenous elders led thousands of marchers down Portage avenue alongside the Buffalo Gals, highlighting the presence, voices, and experiences of Indigenous women within the context of the march and feminist dialogue. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Indigenous elders led thousands of marchers down Portage avenue alongside the Buffalo Gals, highlighting the presence, voices, and experiences of Indigenous women within the context of the march and feminist dialogue. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Many marchers stressed the importance of protecting reproductive rights in the wake of a Republican government which has already reinstated the Mexico City policy — a law which prohibits the U.S. from providing funding to international non-governmental organizations offering family planning services and resources if they include abortion — within its first week in office. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

A marcher rephrased Flavia Dzodan’s popular piece, “My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit” for the march. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Feline imagery — a feminist reclamation and response to Donald Trump’s “grab them by the pussy” comment — was a popular theme among marchers. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Several marchers underscored the importance of prioritizing voices diverging from the often white, cisgender, heterosexual, and upper-class face of commercialized, mainstream feminism. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Feminist theory and praxis must welcome and embrace the healthy anger of marginalized communities, who are all too often made to believe that their anger is baseless or invalid by privileged people. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Marchers from the LGBTTQIA* community had a strong presence on Saturday, emphasizing the necessary cross-over of LGBTTQIA* activism into effective feminist action.
 Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

Trans inclusivity is essential to intersectional feminism, and many marchers highlighted this with signs calling for the rejection of trans-exclusionary radical feminist (or TERF) ideology. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

We are far from immune to racism and misogyny in Canada. This marcher expressed a collective need to bring justice, reconciliation, and healing to Indigenous communities by honouring the lives of Indigenous women and girls stolen by violence and bigotry. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

March organizers hosted speakers in Portage Place for the duration of the event for those unable to join the march. Johise Namwira (above) shared words of encouragement and solidarity to close the hugely successful event. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.

 

The future is female, Black, Queer, disabled. The future is Indigenous, transgender, immigrant, sustainable. The future is working-class, Muslim, non-binary, and so much more. The future is everything but the status quo. Photo by Carolyne Kroeker.